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The image is from '5 New York Evenings' which was held at Moderna Museet in September 1964 Photo: Stig T Karlsson

The image is from "5 New York Evenings"
which was held at Moderna Museet in September 1964
Photo: Stig T Karlsson

Collection
Collection
Coca-Cola Plan
Coca-Cola Plan
"Every time I would show them to people, some would say they're paintings, others called them sculptures. And then I heard this story about Calder," he said, referring to the artist Alexander Calder, "that nobody would look at his work because they didn't know what to call it. As soon as he began calling them mobiles, all of a sudden people would say 'Oh, so that's what they are.' So I invented the term 'Combine' to break out of that dead end of something not being a sculpture or a painting. And it seemed to work." - In Carol Vogel, " A half-century of Rauschenberg's 'junk' art," New York Times (December 2005).
Untitled
Untitled
What Colleen finds so inspiring about Robert Rauschenberg: "He proves that anything can be art; he opens the medium and allows space to evoke ideas with emotionally charged evidence. Rauschenberg's astounding ability to create and compose three dimensionally while speaking to our ever-present detritus breaks us out of our box and pulls us back in again. Rauschenburg's Combines bring me hope and energy to create and dream of even bigger things."
Minutiae
Minutiae
Robert Rauschenberg: Combines is perhaps the most important solo exhibition of this artist's works ever to be shown. The works are best described as free-standing or wall-mounted objects combining painting and sculpture, produced between 1954 and 1964, a prolific period in Rauschenberg's long and outstanding oeuvre. Rauschenberg was boundless in his choice of materials, combining newspaper cuttings and photographs, like the cubists, dadaists and surrealists, with objects found on his own rubbish dump - of which Coca-Cola bottles, pinups, rubber tyres and stuffed animals are but a few examples.

It is no exaggeration to say that Rauschenberg redefined American art when he invented the Combine. With these works he exploded the traditional boundary between painting and sculpture, and instead brought the street into the studio. Rauschenberg resumed the dialogue with the outer world that the preceding artist generation, the abstract expressionists, had consistently excluded from their art. The 162 combines he created during a ten-year period also demonstrate his influence on later isms and genres, such as pop art, neo-dada, assemblage, fluxus, Viennese actionism, arte povera and performance art.

Robert Rauschenberg (originally Milton) was born in Port Arthur, Texas, in 1925. After studying pharmacology at the University of Texas he was drafted into the Navy and spent many years caring for mental patients at various Navy hospitals in California. He started painting portraits of his fellow navy recruits that they could send back home to their families. In the late 1940s, he studied at Kansas City Art Institute and at Academie Julian in Paris, where he met the artist Susan Weil, whom he married shortly after. Rauschenberg went on to study at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, where the famous artist and Bauhaus teacher Joseph Albers was on the staff. It was at Black Mountain that Rauschenberg forged his seminal friendship with the avant-garde choreographer and dancer Merce Cunningham and the legendary composers John Cage and David Tudor. It was there, also, that he participated in Cage's Theater Piece #1 which is now considered to be the world's first happening. Robert Rauschenberg currently lives in Captiva in Florida.

Interview
Interview